ADVICE: "What's This Partying Thing?"

Every week, New York City's own party messiah takes your life questions and sets you safely down the right path to a solution in his new weekly advice column in The Village Voice. Read the latest edition of Ask Andrew W.K. below or by clicking HERE.

A full archive of Ask Andrew W.K. can be found HERE.

Need his help? Just send him an email at: AskAWK@villagevoice.com

August 13, 2014

Hello Andrew,

I must admit, I've only recently discovered you and your writing, but I read your column on the dehumanizing effects of our political divide I found it quite poignant. I was intrigued enough to look further into you and your work, and I must say, with all due respect, I just don't understand your obsession with "partying." The juvenile antics, unkempt image, and "partying" themes cheapen the quality of your ideas and, to be frank, make it very hard to take you seriously. I guess I just don't get it.

Sincerely,
Intelligent Observer

Dear Intelligent Observer,

The very nature of partying is to provide a life-saving release from the constant pressure to "take things seriously." Seriousness of the sort you're describing is precisely why things like partying are crucial to our mental and spiritual health. I take joy very seriously, and partying is the formal pursuit and celebration of joy itself. I'm having a party to celebrate life. I'm having a party to celebrate partying itself.

It seems to me that people often equate intelligence with seriousness, and stupidity with playfulness. These people also tend to overvalue a sort of stoic distance and lack of excitement and enthusiasm as somehow being a sign of wisdom and advanced thinking. An austere and somber attitude doesn't make someone smarter or more intellectual. Sometimes people are overly serious because they're afraid of looking unkempt, unimportant, uneducated -- they fear they'll "make a fool out of themselves" if they don't remain dower and stiff. In my opinion, if more people aspired to the level of life-mastery and self-actualization that a true fool has attained, there'd be much less conflict in the world. Fools realize that the most ignorant people are usually the ones most violently accusing others of being ignorant. Fools realize that in most cases, understanding is overrated. Most importantly, fools realize that no one really knows what's going on, starting first and foremost with themselves.

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Photo F. Frank Vierti

This news item was posted on: August 13, 2014

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